13 Best Summer and Part-Time Jobs for Teachers

Teaching can be a very rewarding job. Unfortunately, those rewards are typically not monetary. Even though teachers work incredibly hard to provide quality instruction for their students, they are often not paid very well. Many teachers look for part-time work during the school year or a summer job to help them increase their overall earnings.

13-Best-Summer-and-Part-Time-Jobs-for-Teachers

While the average teacher salary is a little over $60,000 a year, that is not the reality for many teachers. In some states and school districts, a teacher may only make around $45,000 a year. $45,000 a year doesn’t go very far to cover food, lodging, and other expenses for teachers and their families. For this reason, it is unfortunately essential for some teachers to look for summer and/or part-time employment opportunities to help them make ends meet.

Other teachers may not have a true financial need to find another job, but may be looking for an outlet or escape from all of the hard work they do in the classroom. A part-time or summer job can help them fill this need.

If you are a teacher and are looking for part-time or summer employment options, you’ve come to the right spot. We’ve reviewed 13 of the best summer and part-time off-line jobs for teachers. If you’re looking for online employment options, be on the lookout for our next article where we’ll share some jobs you can do from the comfort of your home with just your computer.

Jobs that are Connected with Teaching:

  1. 1. Camp Counselor →
  2. 2. Tutor →
  3. 3. Community Class Instructor →
  4. 4. Summer School Teacher →
  5. 5. Babysitter →
  6. 6. Teacher Abroad →
  7. 7. Youth Sports Coach →

For Those Who Want to Try Something New:

  1. 8. Library Assistant →
  2. 9. Housekeeper →
  3. 10. Elderly Companion Care →
  4. 11. Pet Sitter/ Dog Walker →
  5. 12. Gardener →
  6. 13. Part-Time Landlord →

Jobs that are Connected with Teaching

Most teachers get into teaching because they love working with children. When looking for a part-time job, you may want to look for a position that will allow you to continue to work with children. The jobs highlighted in this section do just that. But don’t worry, they’ll be much less intense and demanding than teaching in a classroom.

1. Camp Counselor

Being a camp counselor is a great summer job for a teacher. Many of the skills teachers use in the classroom will be a great asset as a camp counselor. For example, strong classroom management skills can come in very handy when trying to manage a group of excited children at camp.

Camp Counselor

As a camp counselor, your job would include overseeing and implementing the different activities or programs for the camp you’re working at. You may also be responsible for planning some of these activities, but that may vary with different positions.

Bing a camp counselor can be very rewarding. You’ll have the opportunity to develop some deep relationships with your students while having some fun sharing in the joy of summer camp. Some camps are overnight camps. If you apply for a position at one of these camps, be prepared to stay overnight and supervise the children under your care.

Pros

  • Your teaching experience and skills can give you an upper hand.
  • You will be able to work more closely with a small group of students and form deeper relationships.
  • You’ll get to take part in some of the fun camp activities too.

Cons

  • Depending on the type of camp, you may have to stay overnight with the children in your group.

Best For: Teachers looking for a summer job who would like to work and have fun with children.

2. Tutor

Families looking for a tutor for their son or daughter would be thrilled to find a teacher looking for work. Who else is better suited to tutor a child than a teacher? Tutoring jobs are available year-round, making this a good option for teachers looking for part-time employment during the school year as well as those looking for a summer job.

Tutor

As a tutor, you would work closely with a student (or possibly a small group of students) to help them improve their understanding of a specific subject matter. You may get hired with a specific need in mind (helping a child understand how to multiple fractions) or your job description may be more general (helping a child improve their performance in reading and writing).

Pros

  • Higher hourly rate than many other job options.
  • You may be able to find a tutoring position for the grade-level you teach, so you’d be very familiar with the material.
  • You can control your schedule and pick tutoring times that work for you.

Cons

  • Some schools don’t allow teachers to tutor their own students or others in the building, so you may need to look elsewhere for work.

Best For: Teachers in need of a more flexible job.

3. Community Class Instructor

Many communities offer courses on a variety of topics. Many of these may be geared towards children, while others may be more geared towards adults. Community classes could really be on anything, including art, yoga, finances, and more.

Community Class Instructor

If you’re interested in teaching a community class, you may even be able to pitch your own idea for a class, which would allow you to teach something you’re truly passionate about. For example, if you love taking and editing photographs in your spare time, talk to the individuals in charge of the classes about teaching a photography class.

Pros

  • You can teach something that is of interest to you.
  • You’ll likely be teaching a smaller group than you deal within the classroom.
  • Students who sign up for these classes should be interested in the subject matter, which should cut down on behavior problems.

Cons

  • Depending on where you teach, these jobs may not pay as well as some of the other options on our list.

Best For: Teachers who are looking for summer or weekend work options.

4. Summer School Teacher

Teaching summer school is a popular option that many teachers choose. As a summer school teacher, you’ll be responsible for planning and delivering instruction to a group of students. A typical summer school day is shorter than a regular school day. Summer school is designed to help students retain information, improve their foundational skills, and expand on what they learned over the course of the school year.

If you’re interested in teaching summer school, you may be able to do so in the same school where you’re currently teaching. This may mean that you’ll already know some of the students in your class, which may help you when working on routines and setting expectations.

This video shares a few other benefits and drawbacks of teaching summer school that you may want to consider before applying for a position.

Pros

  • Shorter hours than teaching during the school year.
  • There are typically fewer behavior problems since students are more invested.
  • You may be able to work with an age group that you are already familiar with.

Cons

  • You won’t get as much of a mental break from school and being in the classroom to help you prepare for the fall.

Best For: Teachers looking for summer employment who would like to teach a familiar curriculum or work in a familiar environment.

5. Babysitter

Babysitting is something you can easily do in addition to one of the other jobs on this list. Or, you may choose to only babysit in addition to teaching. Babysitting is a relatively easy job that won’t require too much prep work. You may be watching children who are anywhere from a few weeks or months old to young adolescents.

Babysitter

Your duties as a babysitter will largely depend on the age of the children you’re watching and how long you’re watching them for. You may be responsible for cooking meals or putting them to be. Some babysitters may also be asked to drive children to or from different classes or events. You could also be asked to stay at a home overnight if the parents will be gone for a night. Babysitters typically also have the opportunity to unwind and have some fun playing with the children they’re watching.

Pros

  • If you have your own children, you may be able to bring them with you.
  • You will have the flexibility to work only on the days and times that fit in your schedule.
  • You can unwind and have fun with the kids.

Cons

  • Not very high paying.

Best For: Teachers who need a job that offers flexibility and those who have their own young children who may need to come with them to work.

6. Teacher Abroad

If you’re looking for a summer job that will give you the opportunity to travel and explore, then you may want to consider becoming a teacher abroad. As a teacher abroad, you’ll be teaching students in another country. The exact content matter you teach will likely vary based on the specific position you get hired for.

Teacher Abroad

Many teachers abroad teach English to students who speak another language. If you’re interested in becoming an English teacher, these articles on TESOL certification programs (https://mytechclassroom.com/tesol-certification-programs/) and TEFL certification programs (https://mytechclassroom.com/tefl-online-certification-programs/) can help you get started.

Pros

  • You can visit a country you’ve always wanted to see.
  • You may have some say in the type of course you teach.
  • Helping a student learn a new language can be very rewarding.

Cons

  • Working with English language learners can be quite challenging.

Best For: Teachers looking for a job that will let them travel over the summers.

7. Youth Sports Coach

If you are a sports enthusiast, played a sport when you were in high school or college, or are currently on a sport’s team, you might want to look into getting a job as a youth sports coach. This could be a good job over the summer as well as during the school year. Since games and practices take place outside of the school day, you won’t need to worry about them conflicting with your teaching duties.

Youth Sports Coach

As a youth sports coach, you can share your love of a particular sport with the children you coach. Sports are a great way for children to build confidence and develop teamwork skills, so you could be an integral part of helping them work on these concepts. Depending on the sport your coach and age of the students, you should expect to be responsible for a few practices each week in addition to one, or possibly two, games.

Pros

  • You can help children increase their confidence and learn to collaborate with others.
  • There shouldn’t be scheduling conflicts with your teaching schedule.
  • You’ll have the opportunity to share your love of sports with others.

Cons

  • You may have some early morning games on the weekends.

Best For: Teachers who love sports and would enjoy sharing this love with children.

For Those Who Want to Try Something New

Some teachers are looking for something completely different from teaching when researching different employment opportunities. Some teachers feel like they need a break from working with kids all the time, others may be looking to find a part-time job that matches one of their other interests. In this next section, you’ll find a few job options that will give you the chance to try something new and expand your horizons a little more.

8. Library Assistant

If you’re looking for something that will give you the opportunity to develop and refine skills you may not use in the classroom, think about applying for a position as a library assistant. As the job title implies, a library assistant is responsible for helping with various tasks in a library. Their duties (https://job-descriptions.careerplanner.com/Library-Assistants-Clerical.cfm) include sorting books, returning books to the correct shelf, keeping track of records, checking out books to patrons, and helping individuals find the book they are looking for.

Library Assistant

This would likely be a better job for over the summer, but you may be able to find some libraries that are looking for additional help in the evenings or weekends around your teaching schedule.

Pros

  • You likely won’t need too much training to get started with this position.
  • You’ll still have the opportunity to interact with children in the library, but it won’t be the only part of your job.
  • You’ll be responsible for different tasks, which can add some variety to your day.

Cons

  • Some tasks may seem tedious.

Best For: Teachers who are looking for a job that is less demanding and stressful than teaching in a classroom.

9. Housekeeper

If you enjoy cleaning or believe that you are pretty efficient at completing cleaning tasks, becoming a part-time housekeeper could be a good option to consider. Housekeepers are largely in charge of their own schedule, especially if you work for yourself and find your own clients. You may also be able to get a position with a cleaning company. This may end up paying less per hour, but you might have a steadier stream of jobs, which could end up paying more overall.

Your duties as a housekeeper will vary from job to job. Some people hire housekeepers to do a deep cleaning of their entire home, while others simply want them to take care of more basic tasks, such as vacuuming the floors and cleaning the kitchen and bathrooms. If you think you are interested in becoming a housekeeper, it will be important to learn how to clean both thoroughly and efficiently to help you maximize your earnings.

Pros

  • You should be able to set your own schedule.
  • You will have the option to work for yourself or apply to work with a cleaning company.
  • You will be providing a helpful service that others will appreciate.

Cons

  • You may encounter some very dirty homes that need a lot of work.

Best For: Teachers looking to set their own schedules.

10. Elderly Companion Care

If you have a soft spot in your heart for senior citizens, consider a position in elderly companion care. As a companion for a senior citizen, you’ll be responsible for providing them with assistance to get through their day. This may include driving them to and from doctors’ appointments, helping them cook a meal, and making sure they take their medications.

Elderly Companion Care

Providing emotional support and developing a friendship with the person under your care is the other most important aspect of this job. Many seniors don’t have strong social networks or the ability to easily stay connected and interact with their friends and families. Companions help by providing them with friendship and emotional support to help them feel less isolated and keep them mentally stimulated.

Pros

  • You’ll be providing much-needed emotional support to a senior citizen.
  • Seeing the difference you make in a senior’s life can be very rewarding.
  • You should be able to set a more flexible schedule or work only a few days a week.

Cons

  • Your personality may end up clashing with the person you care for.

Best For: Teachers who would like a job where they can make a difference in the life of a senior citizen.

11. Pet Sitter/ Dog Walker

Some jobs keep people away from their homes for many hours during the day. For this reason, many individuals need to find a dog walker or a pet sitter to come by during the day and feed their animals or take their dogs for a walk. Other times, families may be gone for a few days or even a few weeks and may need someone to check on their pets more frequently or even stay at their house overnight.

Pet Sitter

As a pet sitter, you’ll have the opportunity to interact with lots of cats and dogs. You can also increase the amount of exercise you get each day since you’ll be going on frequent walks with the dogs you’re caring for.

Pros

  • You can spend time bonding with cats and dogs.
  • You’ll get additional exercise taking dogs for a walk.
  • You can decide how many families you want to pet sit for, which will keep you in control of the number of hours you work each week.

Cons

  • This is not a good job during the school year, since most people’s pet sitting needs to take place within the hours of the school day.

Best For: Teachers who love animals and would like a job that will help them get some additional exercise.

12. Gardener

Another job you may want to consider is that of a gardener. As a gardener, your job would be to tend to the gardens at different locations. You might find a job with a property management company and work on planting and maintaining the gardens at their properties, or you may be able to find some private clients who would like someone to tend to the gardens at their home.

Gardening

As a gardener, you would be responsible for planting and watering different flowers, plants, and bushes. You would also need to monitor and attend to the needs of the plants under your care, for example by pruning bushes. Some other responsibilities may include mowing lawns, creating floral designs for a garden bed, weeding the gardens, and making sure there are no loose debris on walkways around the garden space.

Pros

  • You can spend time working outside.
  • You will be contributing to the beauty of a space.
  • You may have the opportunity to develop some landscaping design skills.

Cons

  • Some gardening work can be very labor-intensive.

Best For: Teachers who love flowers and plants and would enjoy spending time outside.

13. Part-Time Landlord

Finally, you may also want to consider looking for a job as a part-time landlord or working with a property management company at an apartment complex. Your duties would include attending to the needs of the tenants, collecting and processing rent payments, and overseeing the work of different individuals on the property (including landscaping crews and maintenance workers).

Part-Time Landlord

This job may be best suited for those looking for summer employment, but you may be able to find some companies that are looking for evening or weekend support.

Pros

  • Your duties will be varied, which can keep the job from getting boring.
  • You may be able to set your own office hours.
  • You should be able to work in an air-conditioned space.

Cons

  • Dealing with angry tenants will likely not be very pleasant.

Best For: Teachers looking for summer employment in an office setting.

Wrap-Up

As you can see, there are lots of part-time and summer jobs that are well-suited for teachers. Hopefully, we’ve helped you identify a few positions that you may be interested in. Get your resume together and start your job search today. In addition to sharing your resume, consider writing a cover letter sharing why you’d be a good fit for the position you’re interested in.

If you choose a part-time or summer job that involves working with students, consider using some of these team-building activities to help the children under your care get to know each other. These makerspace activities for special needs students could also easily be adapted to use in a camp setting.

Last Updated on September 21, 2020 by Emily

Emily/ author of the article

Emily is an active mother of two and a dedicated elementary school teacher. She believes the latest technology has made a huge impact on the quality of early learning and has worked hard to upgrade her classroom and her own children’s learning experience through technology.
She created this blog to make it easier for other teachers to take advantage of some of the best devices out there to upgrade their classrooms without having to do the research themselves. She loves to hear your tech-based problems and share her extensive experience :)

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